Talks from the Hoover Institution
How Dangerous Are Cyberattacks? Office Hours with Jackie Schneider

How Dangerous Are Cyberattacks? Office Hours with Jackie Schneider

March 25, 2022

Hoover Fellow Jackie Schneider follows up on your questions about the danger of cyberattacks from her PolicyEd video.

1. In your video you point out that cyberattacks haven’t yet led to physical harm, but is that always going to be the case? We’re moving to a world with the “internet of things.” What sort of vulnerabilities might occur in the future that could lead to actual harm?

2. Can you paint a picture for us on what active cyber warfare would look like from both civilian and military perspectives? If we were to enter a conflict with state actors like Russia, China or Iran, what would their cyberattacks look like?

3. How can the public recognize foreign interference in cyberspace, especially misinformation campaigns? And do you have advice for how people can better protect themselves?

4. Should we be worried about the government collaborating with private companies on the issue of cybersecurity? Are there privacy concerns that outweigh potential benefits?

5. In your video, you mention “pre-emptively degrading” the capabilities of our adversaries in cyberspace. Why isn’t that treated as an act of war or at least a source of conflict in international relations? And what does that look like?

Click to watch the original video, “How Dangerous Are Cyberattacks?

US-Japan Global Dialogue

US-Japan Global Dialogue

March 25, 2022
Tuesday, March 22, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

The Hoover Institution and Japan Society of Northern California host US Japan Global Dialogue on Tuesday, March 22, 2022 from 12:30pm - 7:30pm PT.

In a rapidly changing Indo-Pacific region, Japan remains America’s core ally, Asia’s most stable democracy, and the world’s third-largest economy. The US-Japan alliance is poised to enter a new era and expand its focus to cooperate on next-generation technology, development issues, civil society development, and maintenance of security. The Hoover Institution’s US-Japan Global Dialogue explores the future of this critical relationship. The dialogue launched on March 22, 2022 (United States) / March 23, 2022 (Japan) with a private, one-day hybrid conference hosted by the Hoover Institution. Attendees included both US and Japanese senior government officials, eminent scholars, and leading private-sector actors.

The conference began with a lunch hosted by the Hoover Institution and the Japan Society of Northern California followed by a panel discussion with Senator Bill Hagerty (R-TN), Japanese ambassador to the United States Koji Tomita, and former US ambassador to Japan John Roos in discussion with LTG (ret.) H. R. McMaster, moderated by Dr. Michael Auslin. It also included a Hoover Institution Library & Archives exhibit Histories Connect: Special Exhibitions of Japanese and Japanese American Collections with Dr. Kaoru (Kay) Ueda, Curator of the Japanese Diaspora Collection.

Later in the day, a closed hybrid conference covered the following topics: 1) improving security cooperation between the United States and Japan and with other partners; 2) deepening economic and financial cooperation; 3) deepening cooperation in the development and application of new technologies; and 4) protecting liberal values and democratic sovereignty in Asia and beyond. At the conference, one American and one Japanese expert each presented short papers on each topic.


PARTICIPANT BIOS
H.E. Tomita, Koji
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to the United States of America
Ambassador Tomita’s diplomatic career in the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) spans 40 years. Most recently, he served as Japan’s Ambassador to Korea, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Personal Representative for the G20 Summit in Osaka, and Ambassador to Israel. His relationship with the United States began when he studied in North Carolina for a year in college. Since he entered MOFA, he has also held leadership positions in U.S.-Japan relations, including Director-General of MOFA’s North American Affairs Bureau and Deputy Chief of Mission at the Embassy of Japan in Washington, D.C. Ambassador Tomita graduated from the University of Tokyo, Faculty of Law and joined Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1981.

United States Senator Bill Hagerty
Senator Hagerty was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2020 and is currently serving his first term representing the state of Tennessee. His committee assignments include: U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, & Urban Affairs; U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations; U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations; and the U.S. Senate Committee on Rules & Administration. Prior to his election to the U.S. Senate, Hagerty served as the U.S. Ambassador to Japan, the world’s third largest economy and America’s closest ally in the region. Hagerty is a life-long businessman. He started his business career with the Boston Consulting Group, where his work took him to five continents, including three years based in Tokyo, Japan.

Ambassador John V. Roos 
John V. Roos is the Founding Partner at Geodesic Capital, a venture capital firm that bridges Japan and Silicon Valley by investing in growth-stage technology companies and helping them with market entry, strategy, and overall operational support in Japan. Previously, Ambassador Roos served as Chief Executive Officer and Senior Partner at Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich, & Rosati, the leading law firm in the United States in the representation of technology, life sciences, and emerging growth companies. From 2014-2020 Ambassador Roos served on the Board of Sony Corporation  From 2009-2013 Ambassador Roos served as the United States Ambassador to Japan. Ambassador Roos received his A.B. with honors in Political Science from Stanford University and a J.D. from Stanford Law School.

LTG (ret.) H.R. McMaster
H. R. McMaster is the Fouad and Michelle Ajami Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.  He is also the Bernard and Susan Liautaud Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and lecturer at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business.  He serves as the Japan Chair at the Hudson Institute and Chairman of the Center for Political and Military Power at the Foundation for Defense of Democracy.  He was the 26th assistant to the president for National Security Affairs. McMaster served as a commissioned officer in the United States Army for thirty-four years after graduation from West Point.  He holds a PhD in military history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He is author of Battlegrounds: The Fight to Defend the Free World and Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Lies that Led to Vietnam.  He is host of the podcast Battlegrounds: International Perspectives on Crucial Challenges to Security and Prosperity.

Michael Auslin
Michael Auslin is the Payson J. Treat Distinguished Research Fellow in Contemporary Asia at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. A historian by training, he specializes in US policy in Asia and geopolitical issues in the Indo-Pacific region. Auslin is the author of six books, including Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific and is a longtime contributor to the Wall Street Journal and National Review. Auslin also cohosts the podcast The Pacific Century. Previously, Auslin was an associate professor of history at Yale University, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, and a visiting professor at the University of Tokyo. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, the senior advisor for Asia at the Halifax International Security Forum, a senior fellow at London’s Policy Exchange, and a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. Among his honors are being named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, a Fulbright Scholar, and a German Marshall Fund Marshall Memorial Fellow. He serves on the board of the Wilton Park USA Foundation. 

Ways and Means: Lincoln and his Cabinet, and the Financing of the Civil War

Ways and Means: Lincoln and his Cabinet, and the Financing of the Civil War

March 25, 2022
Friday, March 18, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

In his latest book, Roger Lowenstein investigates not only how Lincoln and his secretary of Treasury, Salmon P. Chase, funded the Civil War. He also explores how Lincoln’s financial strategy catalyzed a long-lasting political and economic transformation of the United States.


ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Roger Lowenstein is a financial historian, the author of NYT bestsellers such as BuffettWhen Genius Failed, and The End of Wall Street, and the critically acclaimed Origins of the CrashWhile America Aged, and America’s Bank. He previously reported for The Wall Street Journal for more than a decade, and his work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, The New York Times, the Washington Post, Fortune, Atlantic, the New York Review of Books, and other publications.


ABOUT THE PROGRAM
This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.

Cadre Country: How China Became The Chinese Communist Party

Cadre Country: How China Became The Chinese Communist Party

March 18, 2022
Wednesday, March 16, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

The Hoover Project on China’s Global Sharp Power invites you to "Cadre Country: How China became the Chinese Communist Party" on Wednesday, March 16, 2022, at 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm PT.

China’s communist party regards itself as engaged in a global information war. In his new book, Cadre Country, historian John Fitzgerald probes some of the key stories the party tells to advance its cause. In this talk, he focuses on one story that resonates in China and internationally, China’s ‘Century of Humiliation.’ Where does this term come from, when it is deployed, and why?


SPEAKER
John Fitzgerald is an Emeritus Professor at the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. He served for five years as China Representative of The Ford Foundation in Beijing (2008-2013) before heading the Asia-Pacific philanthropy studies program at Swinburne University. His books include Big White Lie: Chinese Australians in White Australia, awarded the Ernest Scott Prize of the Australian Historical Association, and Awakening China: Politics, Culture and Class in the Nationalist Revolution, awarded the Joseph Levenson Prize of the US Association for Asian Studies. His latest book is Cadre Country: How China became the Chinese Communist Party (2022).

MODERATOR
Glenn Tiffert is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a historian of modern China. He co-chairs the Hoover project on China’s Global Sharp Power and works closely with government and civil society partners to document and build resilience against authoritarian interference with democratic institutions. Most recently, he co-authored and edited Global Engagement: Rethinking Risk in the Research Enterprise (2020).

Wargames and National Security

Wargames and National Security

March 17, 2022
Wednesday, March 16, 2022
 

The Hoover Institution hosts Wargaming: Its History, Application, and Future Use on February 16, February 23, and March 16, 2022.

The March 16 session discusses how wargames impact national security and defense decision making and whether social science methods can inform these kinds of games.


SPEAKERS

Mr. Bob Work was the thirty-second Deputy Secretary of Defense, serving alongside three Secretaries of Defense from May 2014 to July 2017.

Dr. Micah Zenko is the Director of Research and Learning, McChrystal Group.

Dr. Stacie Pettyjohn a Senior Fellow and Director of the Defense Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS).

The Strategic Value Of India

The Strategic Value Of India

March 15, 2022
Tuesday, March 15, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

The Hoover Institution Program on Strengthening US-India Relations invites you to a virtual panel discussion on The Strategic Value of India on Tuesday, March 15, 2022 from 9:00AM – 10:00AM PT.

How should the US approach India? For much of the twentieth century, the relationship between the US and India could best be described as uneasy. Over the past two decades the countries have worked together to strengthen this relationship, mostly along cultural and economic lines. In this event, three leading experts make the case that the US must also recognize the strategic importance of India. Deeper relations between the two countries—and possibly even preferential treatment from the US side—could advance prosperity and peace. 


SPEAKERS
David C. Mulford is a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution. He served as the twenty-first U.S. ambassador to the Republic of India from 2004–2009. After completing his post in India, Mulford served as the vice chairman international at Credit Suisse where he worked with a range of clients across the integrated bank with a particular focus on governments, as well as corporate clients, across the globe. Mulford was undersecretary and assistant secretary of the US Treasury for International Affairs from 1984 to 1992. He served as the senior international economic policy official at the Treasury under Secretaries Regan, Baker, and Brady where he was the US deputy for coordination of economic policies with other G-7 industrial nations and took part in the administration’s international debt strategy, and the development and implementation of the Baker / Brady Plans, and President Bush’s Enterprise Initiative for the Americas. 

Kenneth I. Juster is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He has over forty years of experience as a senior government official, senior business executive, and senior law partner. He recently completed service as the twenty-fifth U.S. ambassador to the Republic of India from 2017–2021. Juster previously served in the U.S. government as deputy assistant to the president for international economic affairs, on both the National Security Council and the National Economic Council, undersecretary of commerce, counselor (acting) of the State Department, and deputy and senior advisor to Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger.  


MODERATED BY
Larry Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, the Mosbacher Senior Fellow in Global Democracy at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), and a Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. He is also professor, by courtesy, of political science and sociology at Stanford. He leads the Hoover Institution’s programs on China’s Global Sharp Power and on Taiwan in the Indo-Pacific Region.  At FSI, he leads the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy, based at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, which he directed for more than six years.  He also coleads (with Eileen Donahoe) the Global Digital Policy Incubator based at FSI’s Cyber Policy Center.  

International Women’s Day @ The Hoover Institution | Notes From The U.S. State Department

International Women’s Day @ The Hoover Institution | Notes From The U.S. State Department

March 9, 2022
Tuesday, March 8, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

To celebrate International Women’s Day, please join us for a conversation with Katharine BeamerJendayi FrazerCondoleezza Rice, and Kiron Skinner on March 8 from 3:00 - 4:30PM PT. Moderated by Jacquelyn Schneider, the group will discuss their experiences when working at the State Department and their roles in affecting change in America’s foreign policy through diplomacy and advocacy on the national and global stage. We celebrate the women who increasingly influence and shape the priorities, rules, and assessments of U.S. foreign policymaking.

Hoover Book Club: Tim Kane on The Immigrant Superpower

Hoover Book Club: Tim Kane on The Immigrant Superpower

March 8, 2022
Tuesday, March 8, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

Join the Hoover Book Club for engaging discussions with leading authors on the hottest policy issues of the day. Hoover scholars explore the latest books that delve into some of the most vexing policy issues facing the United States and the world. Find out what makes these authors tick and how they think we should approach our most difficult challenges.

A discussion with Tim Kane on his latest book, The Immigrant Superpower moderated by Bill Whalen on Tuesday, March 8 at 10AM PT/1:00PM ET.

Historical Conversations: Russia vs. Ukraine

Historical Conversations: Russia vs. Ukraine

March 5, 2022
Friday, March 4, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

It should come as no surprise that history is at the heart of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Russian President Vladmir Putin in July of last year argued as much in his essay, “On the Historical Unity of Russians and Ukrainians.” But few if any Ukrainian or Western historians regard Putin’s argument as anything other than propaganda. Join us for a Historical Conversation with two distinguished scholars as we explore the end of the Cold War, NATO expansion, the rise of Vladmir Putin, and the events leading to today’s conflict.


ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Mary Sarotte is the Kravis Distinguished Professor at Hopkins-SAIS, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a visiting faculty fellow at Harvard’s Center for European Studies. She is the author of Not One Inch, which uses new evidence and interviews to show how, in the decade that culminated in Vladimir Putin’s rise to power, the United States and Russia undermined a potentially lasting partnership.

Chris Miller is Assistant Professor of international history at The Fletcher School at Tufts University and co-director of the school's Russia and Eurasia Program. His upcoming book, Chip War, explores how Soviet shortcomings in microchip production helped usher the end of the Cold War. He is author of We Shall Be Masters: Russia's Pivots to East Asia from Peter the Great to Putin (2021), Putinomics: Power and Money in Resurgent Russia(2018) and The Struggle to Save the Soviet Economy (2016).

ABOUT THE MODERATOR
Niall Ferguson is the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a senior faculty fellow of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard. He is the author of sixteen books, including Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe. He is a renowned historian of finance, war, and international relations, having written The Pity of War, The House of Rothschild, Empire, Civilization, and Kissinger, 1923–1968: The Idealist, which won the Council on Foreign Relations Arthur Ross Prize.


ABOUT THE PROGRAM
This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.

Antitrust & the Future of Big Tech

Antitrust & the Future of Big Tech

March 5, 2022
Thursday, March 3, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

The Hoover Institution Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group invites you to a virtual discussion on Antitrust & the Future of Big Tech on Thursday, March 3, 2022 from 9:00 am - 10:00 am Pacific.

It’s no secret that the Biden administration and 117th Congress are targeting Big Tech. Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle are pursuing legislation that targets the market power amassed by companies including Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. Leaders at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division–key enforcement agencies–are also aligned against Big Tech; the FTC is actively prosecuting a lawsuit against Facebook for monopoly behavior. 

Joe Lonsdale, Managing Partner at 8VC and Co-Founder of Palantir, joins us virtually to discuss how antitrust law may impact high-tech firms’ size and sway. He recently proposed in a February 7, 2022 Wall Street Journal article that Amazon should be split into two businesses – AWS and Amazon.com – not because big is “bad,” but because Amazon’s ability to undercut its competitors with below-cost prices may stifle the scope and speed of innovation in areas like logistics. We hope you will join us to learn more about what antitrust advocates are getting right, what they are getting wrong, and the potential impact of breaking up Big Tech.


ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Joe Lonsdale is a technology entrepreneur and investor. He is the managing partner at 8VC, a US-based venture capital firm that manages several billion dollars in committed capital. He was an early institutional investor in many notable technology start-ups including Oculus (acq.FB), Guardant Health (NASDAQ: GH), Oscar (NYSE: OSCR), Illumio, Anduril, Wish (NASDAQ: WISH), JoyTunes, Blend (NASDAQ: BLND), Flexport, Joby Aviation (NASDAQ: JOBY), Cityblock, Orca Bio, Qualia, Synthego, RelateIQ (acq.CRM), and many others. Joe has been on the Forbes 100 Midas List since 2016 and was the youngest member included in 2016 and 2017, and ranked 18th in the world last year.

Before focusing on institutional investing, Joe co-founded Palantir (NASDAQ: PLTR) a global software company known for its work in defense and other industries, as well as for providing the platform to run the COVID-19 common operating picture for key decision makers in over 35 countries. After Palantir, he founded and remains as Chairman of both Addepar, which has over $3 trillion USD managed on its wealth management technology platform, and OpenGov, which provides software for over 2,000 municipalities and state agencies. More recently, he is also a co-founder of Affinity, Epirus, Resilience Bio, and other mission-driven technology companies, which he continues to create with his team out of the 8VC Build program. Joe began his career as an early executive at Clarium Capital, which he helped grow into a large global macro hedge fund. He also worked with PayPal while he attended Stanford.


PARTICIPANTS

Bradley Body, Mark Brilliant, Tom Gilligan, Taylor McLamb, Max Meyer, Elena Pastorino, Meghana Reddy, Manny Rincon-Cruz, Marie-Christine Slakey, John Taylor, Amy Zegart

 

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