Talks from the Hoover Institution
Watch This Space: Beijing’s Push To Close Off Taiwan’s International Space And The U.S. Response

Watch This Space: Beijing’s Push To Close Off Taiwan’s International Space And The U.S. Response

May 28, 2021
Thursday, May 27, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

The project on Taiwan in the Indo-Pacific Region, and the National Security Task Force the Hoover Institution hosts a conversation on Watch This Space: Beijing’s Push to Close Off Taiwan’s International Space and the U.S. Response on Thursday, May 27, 2021 at 4:30 PM PT.

As the World Health Assembly convenes amidst the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic, it does so again without Taiwan’s participation. That the WHA would exclude Taiwan—whose democracy has deployed perhaps the world’s most effective response to COVID-19—puts into sharp relief the costs for populations around the globe of China’s broader attempt to close off Taiwan’s international space. On the occasion of the 74th WHA, it’s worth examining the impetus behind China’s campaign to isolate Taiwan, the threat that campaign poses to the stability fostered by the U.S. One China policy, and how the United States can respond to bolster Taiwan’s international space and maintain balance in the cross-Strait situation.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Alex Wong, an expert in East Asia & the Pacific National Security International Relations at Hudson Institute, a think tank and research center dedicated to nonpartisan analysis of US and international economic, security, and political issues. Alex Wong is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute, with a focus U.S. strategy in the Indo-Pacific region and the future of the Korean Peninsula.

Kharis Templeman is a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, where he manages the Project on Taiwan in the Indo-Pacific, and a lecturer at Stanford’s Center for East Asian Studies. His areas of expertise include democratic transitions and consolidations, comparative parties and elections, and the politics of Taiwan. He is the editor (with Larry Diamond and Yun-han Chu) of Taiwan’s Democracy Challenged: The Chen Shui-bian Years (2016) and Dynamics of Democracy in Taiwan: The Ma Ying-jeou Years (2020). His other peer-reviewed research has been published in Comparative Political Studies, Ethnopolitics, The Taiwan Journal of Democracy, International Journal of Taiwan Studies, and The APSA Annals of Comparative Democratization, along with several book chapters.

Click the following link for more information about the Hoover Project on Taiwan in the Indo-Pacific Region https://www.hoover.org/research-teams/hoover-institution-project-taiwan-indo-pacific-region 

 

Making Congress Work: A Bipartisan Policy Discussion With Senator Jack Reed

Making Congress Work: A Bipartisan Policy Discussion With Senator Jack Reed

May 26, 2021

Wednesday, May 26, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Senator Jack Reed in conversation with Kevin Hassett on Wednesday, May 26, 2021 at 4:00 PM ET.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Kevin Hassett is a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and Vice President and Managing Director of the Lindsey Group. He served as the 29th Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers from 2017 to 2019, and returned to the White House in 2020 as a Senior Advisor to the President to manage the economic policy response to the pandemic. He served as Director of Research for the American Enterprise Institute for almost two decades, and prior to that was Senior Economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, and an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Business of Columbia University. 

U.S. Senator Jack Reed is Rhode Island’s senior senator and the Chairman of the Armed Services Committee.  He is also a member of the Appropriations Committee, where he serves as Chairman of the Legislative Branch Subcommittee; the Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee; and an ex-officio member of the Intelligence Committee.  A leader on national defense, housing, unemployment, and consumer protection issues, Senator Reed was part of the bipartisan working group that drafted the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act and successfully led efforts to create the $150 billion Coronavirus Relief Fund to help states combat COVID-19.  Reed graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1971 and served in the U.S. Army and Army Reserves until 1991, when he retired with the rank of Major.  Reed also earned a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and a law degree from Harvard Law School.  He served on the faculty at West Point, teaching cadets about economics and international relations as an Associate Professor within the Department of Social Sciences, and also worked in private practice as an attorney for Edwards & Angell, where he specialized in banking and securities law.

For more information go to: https://www.hoover.org/publications/capital-conversations 

‘The Cold War is Over and You Have Won’: Semiconductors and the Revolution in Military Affairs

‘The Cold War is Over and You Have Won’: Semiconductors and the Revolution in Military Affairs

May 25, 2021

Monday, May 24, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The USSR had thrived during the nuclear revolution of the 1950s, matching America's ability to produce powerful missiles and destructive warheads. But accuracy eluded the USSR. Precision strike was produced by miniaturizing computing power, so it was limited by the capacity of the computer chips crammed into the nose of each missile. The Soviets faced fundamental challenges in their ability to fabricate tiny circuits. Their guidance systems were therefore always substantially less accurate. In the 1970s, President Jimmy Carter had authorized multiple new highly accurate weapons systems taking advantage of Silicon Valley's most advanced integrated circuits. By the 1980s, when these systems began to be deployed, the USSR had no response. Soviet defense officials feared that a precision conventional strike from the U.S. might even disable the USSR's nuclear forces. Ronald Reagan inherited a Soviet leadership convinced that it had already lost the arms race because it could not produce the computational power needed for precision weaponry.

Chris Miller is assistant professor of international history at The Fletcher School at Tufts University and co-director of the school's Russia and Eurasia Program. He is author of We Shall Be Masters: Russia's Pivots to East Asia from Peter the Great to Putin (2021), Putinomics: Power and Money in Resurgent Russia (2018) and The Struggle to Save the Soviet Economy (2016).  He has previously served as the associate director of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy at Yale, a lecturer at the New Economic School in Moscow, a visiting researcher at the Carnegie Moscow Center, a research associate at the Brookings Institution, and as a fellow at the German Marshall Fund's Transatlantic Academy.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
https://www.hoover.org/research-teams/history-working-group   

This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.

Toward A Democratic China: What Role Can Outsiders Play?

Toward A Democratic China: What Role Can Outsiders Play?

May 25, 2021

Monday, May 24, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution and the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society hosts Toward a Democratic China: What Role Can Outsiders Play? on Monday, May 24 from 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. PDT.

Is there an appetite for democracy in China? Is the regime’s monopoly on political power invincible? Can and should outsiders help Chinese reformers achieve democracy? If so, how? Is regime change possible, anytime soon? Will it lead to democracy or chaos?

Featuring: Roger Garside Former British diplomat, Teng Biao Pozen Visiting Professor, University of Chicago Grove Human Rights Scholar, Hunter College, CUN, Elizabeth Economy Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution and Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations, Orville Schell Arthur Ross Director, Center on U.S.-China Relations Asia Society, and Glenn Tiffert Research Fellow, Hoover Institution

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:
Robert Garside served as a British diplomat in Beijing during the Cultural Revolution and again in 1976-9, when Mao died and Deng launched the Reform Era. His new book China Coup: The Great Leap to Freedom (University of California Press, 2021) challenges readers to rethink China’s political future. 

Teng Biao is an academic lawyer, currently Grove Human Rights Scholar at Hunter College, and Pozen Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago. He is the founder and president of China Against the Death Penalty. 

Elizabeth Economy is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a senior fellow for China studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

HOSTS: 
Orville Schell
is the Arthur Ross Director of the Center on U.S.- China Relations at the Asia Society, New York City. He is a former professor and dean at the University of California, Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism.

Glenn Tiffert is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a historian of modern China. He manages the Hoover project on China’s Global Sharp Power.

Panel II: Responses: Security In The Age Of Liberal Democratic Erosion

Panel II: Responses: Security In The Age Of Liberal Democratic Erosion

May 21, 2021

Thursday, May 20, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution along with the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Europe Center host Security in the Age of Liberal Democratic Erosion​ on Thursday, May 13 and Thursday, May 20.

Cosponsored by the Hoover Institution, the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Europe Center, the virtual two-part panel series Security in the Age of Liberal Democratic Erosion will focus on the critical security challenges facing liberal democracies and examine the threats of external adversaries and how democracies can respond. 

Liberal democracy rests on the rule of law and common trust in fundamental institutions such as elections, courts, legislatures, and the executive branches of government. Yet both in the United States and elsewhere, trust in these institutions has eroded as charges of fake news, electoral fraud, biased courts, and increased authoritarianism have taken hold.

On May 13, 2021, the discussion will focus on Adversaries: how foreign actors such as Russia, China, and Iran interact with domestic threats to institutions and the functioning of liberal democracy. Panelists will examine dangers of sharp and soft power, misinformation, and attacks on sensitive electoral and physical infrastructure. The featured experts will be Elizabeth Economy, Michael McFaul, Abbas Milani, and Kate Starbird. 

On May 20, 2021, the discussion will focus on appropriate Responses, and whether and how liberal democracies should respond to these threats. Panelists will address the tools and policies available to combat such hazards, as well as their limitations. The featured experts will be Rose Gottemoeller, H. R. McMaster, Jacquelyn Schneider, and Amy Zegart. 

Both panel discussions will be moderated by Anna Grzymala-Busse and held at 10:00–11:15 am PDT via Zoom and are open to the public.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Rose Gottemoeller is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and its Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). 

H. R. McMaster is the Fouad and Michele Ajami Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and was the twenty-sixth assistant to the president for national security affairs. He served as a commissioned officer in the US Army for thirty-four years before retiring as a lieutenant general in June 2018. He is author of Battlegrounds: The Fight to Defend the Free World (2020).

Jacquelyn Schneider is a Hoover Fellow at the Hoover Institution.  Her research focuses on the intersection of technology, national security, and political psychology with a special interest in cybersecurity, unmanned technologies, and Northeast Asia.  She is a non-resident fellow at the Naval War College's Cyber and Innovation Policy Institute and a senior policy advisor to the Cyberspace Solarium Commission.

Amy Zegart is the Morris Arnold and Nona Jean Cox Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor of Political Science (by courtesy) at Stanford University. She is also a Senior Fellow at Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Chair of Stanford’s Artificial Intelligence and International Security Steering Committee, and a contributing writer at The Atlantic. She specializes in U.S. intelligence, emerging technologies and national security, grand strategy, and global political risk management.

ABOUT THE MODERATOR
Anna Grzymala-Busse is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. Grzymala-Busse is the Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor in the Department of Political Science, the director of the Europe Center, and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford. Her research focuses on religion and politics, authoritarian political parties and their successors, and the historical development of the state.

A Conversation With Senator Rob Portman

A Conversation With Senator Rob Portman

May 18, 2021

Tuesday, May 18, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Senator Rob Portman in conversation with Lanhee Chen on Tuesday, May 18, 2021 at 3:00 PM ET.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Senator Rob Portman is a United States Senator from the state of Ohio. During his time in the Senate, he has introduced more than 240 bills, including 200 bipartisan bills, and more than 150 of his legislative priorities have been signed into law. Senator Portman began his government career in the U.S. House of Representatives in 1993, serving the Second District in southern Ohio for 12 years. In 2005, he left Congress to serve as the United States Trade Representative. Following his accomplishments in this role, he was asked to serve another Cabinet post, as Director of the Office of Management and Budget.

Lanhee Chen is the David and Diane Steffy Fellow in American Public Policy Studies at the Hoover Institution, and Director of Domestic Policy Studies in the Public Policy Program at Stanford. In 2012, he was policy director of the Romney-Ryan campaign and advised Senator Marco Rubio's 2016 presidential bid.  He was a member of the Social Security Advisory Board and served as a senior appointee at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services during the George W. Bush Administration. 

 

For more information go to: https://www.hoover.org/publications/capital-conversations 

Russia: Empire, War, and Revolution

Russia: Empire, War, and Revolution

May 14, 2021
Thursday, May 13, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

The Hoover Institution hosts Russia: Empire, War, and Revolution on Thursday, May 13, 2021, at 10am PDT.

Join the Hoover Institution Press for a discussion of two recent publications based on the acclaimed Russian collections held at the Hoover Library & Archives, moderated by Russian historian Robert Service. 

Russia in War and Revolution: The Memoirs of Fyodor Sergeyevich Olferieff features the previously unpublished memoirs of a Russian military officer who participated in key transformative historical events, including World War I and the Russian Revolution. Gary Hamburg, volume editor and author of the book’s introduction and companion essay; and the subject’s granddaughter Tanya Alexandra Cameron, who translated his memoirs, will participate in the discussion. Next, author Anatol Shmelev will discuss his book the Wake of Empire: Anti-Bolshevik Russia in International Affairs, 1917–1920, which examines Russia’s place in international affairs in the years after the fall of the Russian Empire, when the anti-Bolshevik “Whites” fought to maintain a “Great, United Russia.”

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Robert Service, a noted Russian historian and political commentator, is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a fellow of St Antony’s College, Oxford.

Gary Hamburg is Otho M. Behr Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College and author or editor of more than seventy works, including Russia's Path toward Enlightenment: Faith, Politics, and Reason, 1500–1801.

Tanya Alexandra Cameron is the granddaughter of Fyodor Sergeyevich Olferieff. She learned Russian and Russian history and traveled extensively to the Soviet Union in order to translate his memoirs.

Anatol Shmelev is a research fellow and Robert Conquest Curator for Russia and Eurasia at the Hoover Institution. His area of specialization is the Russian Civil War, 1917–22.

Panel I: Adversaries: Security in the Age of Liberal Democratic Erosion

Panel I: Adversaries: Security in the Age of Liberal Democratic Erosion

May 13, 2021
Thursday, May 13, 2021 to Thursday, May 20, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

The Hoover Institution along with the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Europe Center host Security in the Age of Liberal Democratic Erosion​ on Thursday, May 13 and Thursday, May 20.

Cosponsored by the Hoover Institution, the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Europe Center, the virtual two-part panel series Security in the Age of Liberal Democratic Erosion will focus on the critical security challenges facing liberal democracies and examine the threats of external adversaries and how democracies can respond. 

Liberal democracy rests on the rule of law and common trust in fundamental institutions such as elections, courts, legislatures, and the executive branches of government. Yet both in the United States and elsewhere, trust in these institutions has eroded as charges of fake news, electoral fraud, biased courts, and increased authoritarianism have taken hold.

On May 13, 2021, the discussion will focus on Adversaries: how foreign actors such as Russia, China, and Iran interact with domestic threats to institutions and the functioning of liberal democracy. Panelists will examine dangers of sharp and soft power, misinformation, and attacks on sensitive electoral and physical infrastructure. The featured experts will be Elizabeth Economy, Michael McFaul, Abbas Milani, and Kate Starbird. 

On May 20, 2021, the discussion will focus on appropriate Responses, and whether and how liberal democracies should respond to these threats. Panelists will address the tools and policies available to combat such hazards, as well as their limitations. The featured experts will be Rose Gottemoeller, H. R. McMaster, Jacquelyn Schneider, and Amy Zegart. 

Both panel discussions will be moderated by Anna Grzymala-Busse and held at 10:00–11:15 am PDT via Zoom and are open to the public.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Elizabeth Economy is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a senior fellow for China studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. In 2020, she was awarded the Richard C. Holbrooke Fellowship at the American Academy in Berlin. An expert on Chinese domestic and foreign policy, Economy is the author of several books, most recently The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping and the New Chinese State (2018).

Michael A. McFaul is the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution as well as a professor of political science, director and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. He also currently works as a news analyst for NBC.  His areas of expertise include international relations, Russian politics, comparative democratization, and American foreign policy.  From January 2012 to February 2014, he served as the US ambassador to the Russian Federation.  Before becoming ambassador, he served for three years as a special assistant to the president and senior director for Russian and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council.

Abbas Milani is a research fellow and codirector of the Iran Democracy Project at the Hoover Institution. In addition, Milani is the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Director of Iranian Studies at Stanford University. His expertise is US/Iran relations and Iranian cultural, political, and security issues.

Kate Starbird is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Cyber Policy Center and Associate Professor at the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) at the University of Washington (UW). Starbird’s research is situated within human-computer interaction (HCI) and the emerging field of crisis informatics—the study of the how information-communication technologies (ICTs) are used during crisis events. She is a co-founder and executive council member of the UW Center for an Informed Public.

ABOUT THE MODERATOR
Anna Grzymala-Busse is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. Grzymala-Busse is the Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor in the Department of Political Science, the director of the Europe Center, and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford. Her research focuses on religion and politics, authoritarian political parties and their successors, and the historical development of the state.

More Than Sharp Power: How The CCP Penetrates Taiwan And Hong Kong

More Than Sharp Power: How The CCP Penetrates Taiwan And Hong Kong

May 12, 2021
Tuesday, May 11, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
 

The Hoover Institution hosts More Than Sharp Power: How the CCP Penetrates Taiwan and Hong Kong on Tuesday, May 11 from 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. PDT.

Called “canaries in the coal mine,” Hong Kong and Taiwan have been at the forefront of the CCP's sharp power play. But Beijing’s influence operations within and toward both territories also go beyond sharp power as the term is commonly understood. This panel will discuss Beijing’s influence mechanisms and the pushbacks that the authors discovered in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and other countries and discuss the most recent news about the CCP’s crackdown on Hong Kong and its impact and response from Hongkongers.

Featuring: Andrew J. Nathan Professor of Political Science Columbia University, Wu Jieh-min Research Fellow Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, Ma Ngok, Associate Professor Chinese University of Hong Kong. Followed by conversation with: Glenn Tiffert, Research Fellow Hoover Institution.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Andrew J. Nathan
 is Class of 1919 Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. His teaching and research interests include Chinese politics and foreign policy, the comparative study of political participation and political culture, and human rights. Nathan’s books include Chinese Democracy (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985); The Tiananmen Papers, co-edited with Perry Link (New York: PublicAffairs, 2001); China’s Search for Security, co-authored with Andrew Scobell (Columbia University Press, 2012); and Will China Democratize?, co-edited with Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). Nathan has served at Columbia as director of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, 1991-1995, chair of the Executive Committee of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 2002-2003, and chair of the Department of Political Science, 2003-2006. He is currently chair of the Morningside Institutional Review Board (IRB). Off campus, he is the regular Asia and Pacific book reviewer for Foreign Affairs, a member of the steering committee of the Asian Barometer Survey, and a board member of Human Rights in China. He is a former member of the boards of the National Endowment for Democracy, Freedom House, and Human Rights Watch. 

Wu Jieh-min is a research fellow at the Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica, and served as a director at the Center for Contemporary China, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan. He is on the advisory committee of Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council and a former board member of the Straits Exchange Foundation. His research interests include political economy, political sociology, social movement, democratization, and civil society. His articles have been published in Chinese-language, English, and Japanese journals and edited volumes. His books include Rent-Seeking Developmental State in China: Taishang, Guangdong Model and Global Capitalism (NTU Press, 2019; English and Japanese editions in progress), China’s influence in the Centre-periphery Tug of War in Hong KongTaiwan and Indo-Pacific (co-edited with Brian C.H. Fong and Andrew J. Nathan eds., Routledge, 2021), Anaconda in the Chandelier: Mechanisms of Influence and Resistance in the “China Factor” (co-edited with Tsai Hung-jeng and Cheng Tsu-bang, Rive Gauche, 2017; Japanese edition forthcoming by Hakusuisha), Third View of China (Rive Gauche, 2012), The Era of Significant Changes: Taiwan 1990-2010 (co-edited with Fan Yun and Thomas Hung-chi Kuo, Rive Gauche, 2010/2014), and The Double Helix of Power and Capital: A Taiwanese Perspective of China/Cross-Strait Studies (editor, Rive Gauche, 2013). He co-produced a documentary film Taiwanese Compatriots (Taibao) (Alleys Studio, 1993).

Ma Ngok is an Associate Professor at the Department of Government and Public Administration, Chinese University of Hong Kong. He writes extensively on elections, party politics, democratization, and social movements of Hong Kong. He is the author of Political Development in Hong Kong: State, Political Society and CIvil Society, and more than 20 journal articles on Hong Kong politics.

 

Ancestors: Where do we come from and why do we care?

Ancestors: Where do we come from and why do we care?

May 10, 2021

Monday, May 10, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Everyone comes from somewhere. From the doctor’s office to the passport office, from whom we've descended affects the biological, legal, and cultural identities of just about everybody in the world today. How did ancestry come to play such a critical role in defining status, and what are the implications of this history for the politics of lineage in the genomic age?

Maya Jasanoff is the X.D. and Nancy Yang Professor of Arts and Sciences and Coolidge Professor of History at Harvard University. She is the author of the prize-winning books Edge of Empire, Liberty’s Exiles, and most recently The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World, winner of the 2018 Cundill Prize in History. Jasanoff is a frequent contributor to publications including The New Yorker and The Guardian, and is chair of judges for the 2021 Booker Prize.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
https://www.hoover.org/research-teams/history-working-group  

This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.

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