Talks from the Hoover Institution
Cyberspace and Warfare

Cyberspace and Warfare

February 27, 2021

Cyberspace and Warfare

Friday, February 26, 2021

The Hoover Institution hosts A Decade Of US Cyber Strategy: A Hoover Chat Series With Cyber Experts And Defense Leaders on January 29, February 12, February 26, March 12, and March 19, 2020.

The February 26 session focuses on how cyber operations affect warfare and how cyber strategy helps (or hurts) the integration of cyber operations in warfighting campaigns, leads to new tactics or operations, and ultimately impacts military effectiveness.

PANELISTS

Dr. Josh Rovner | Associate Professor, School of International Service, American University

VADM (ret.) T. J. White | Former Commander of US Fleet Cyber Command/ US 10th Fleet

Aaron Hughes | Former DASD

Lt Gen Timothy Haugh | Commander, Sixteenth Air Force, Commander, Air Forces Cyber, and Commander, Joint Force Headquarters-Cyber, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas

For more information visit https://www.hoover.org/events/ten-years-us-cyber-strategy-chat-series 

Age of Monetarism

Age of Monetarism

February 24, 2021

Age of Monetarism

Friday, February 19, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

In a draft chapter from her forthcoming biography of Milton Friedman, Jennifer Burns examines Friedman’s influence on Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, comparing their engagement with monetarism in the 1980s. 

Jennifer Burns is the leading independent expert on Ayn Rand and the American conservative movement. She is author of the acclaimed biography Goddess of the Market: Ayn Rand and the American Right. Currently, she is writing an intellectual biography of Milton Friedman. At the Hoover Institution, she directs the annual summer Workshop on Political Economy.

ABOUT THE HOOVER HISTORY WORKING GROUP

https://www.hoover.org/research-teams/history-working-group 

This interview is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.

US-Taiwan Relations and Taiwan’s International Status

US-Taiwan Relations and Taiwan’s International Status

February 20, 2021

Thursday, February 18, 2021

The Hoover Institution hosted US-Taiwan Relations and Taiwan’s International Status on Thursday, February 18, 2021 from 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. PST.

During the Trump administration, bipartisan support for Taiwan grew in the US, partly in response to Beijing’s increasing pressure on Taiwan following the election of Tsai Ing-wen.  The US reduced restrictions on high-level official contacts with Taiwan, many of which had been put in place more than 40 years ago when the US ended formal relations with the Republic of China on Taiwan and normalized relations with the People’s Republic of China.  Washington moved to increase bilateral defense cooperation, support for Taiwan’s international participation, and more.  The Biden administration has indicated that it will not reverse many of these developments and has pledged greater engagement with fellow democracies in the Indo-Pacific, including Taiwan.  Are these developments a sign of a significant deepening of the unofficial partnership between Washington and Taipei?  What do they portend for Taiwan’s international status and security?  In this talk, Jacques deLisle will address these issues in the context of Taiwan’s complicated status in US and international law, and Taiwan’s ongoing quest for international space and stature.

Featured Speaker
Jacques deLisle is the Stephen A. Cozen Professor of Law & Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Center for the Study of Contemporary China at the University of Pennsylvania. Jacques deLisle’s research and teaching focus on contemporary Chinese law and politics, including: legal reform and its relationship to economic reform and political change in China, the international status of Taiwan and cross-Strait relations, China’s engagement with the international order, legal and political issues in Hong Kong under Chinese rule, and U.S.-China relations. His writings on these subjects appear in a variety of fora, including international relations journals, edited volumes of multidisciplinary scholarship, and Asian studies journals, as well as law reviews. DeLisle is also professor of political science, director of the Center for East Asian Studies at Penn, deputy director of the Center for the Study of Contemporary China and director of the Asia Program at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. He has served frequently as an expert witness on issues of P.R.C. law and government policies and is a consultant, lecturer and advisor to legal reform, development and education programs, primarily in China.

Lanhee Chen answers frequently asked questions about the public option

Lanhee Chen answers frequently asked questions about the public option

February 18, 2021
Hoover Institution research fellow Lanhee Chen answers the most popular questions from his video, "What History Tells Us About the Public Option."
 
1. What is the public option and who would be eligible to buy into it?
2. Would the public option make private health insurance illegal?
3. Who would decide how much doctors and hospitals were paid for treating patients on the public option? And how would healthcare providers respond?  
4. What are the chances that the public option would remain deficit-neutral?
5. What effect would the public option have on the cost of health insurance, and what alternatives exist to accomplish the twin goals of expanding access and affordability of health insurance?
 
Historical Progression of Cyber Strategy

Historical Progression of Cyber Strategy

February 12, 2021

Historical Progression of Cyber Strategy

Friday, February 12, 2021

The Hoover Institution hosted A Decade Of US Cyber Strategy: A Hoover Chat Series With Cyber Experts And Defense Leaders on January 29, February 12, February 26, March 12, and March 19, 2020.

The February 12 session focuses on the Historical Progression of Cyber Strategy and looks at how US defense cyber strategy has evolved over the last ten years and what paradigms might guide future strategy.

This series of discussions will look at the evolution of US cyber strategy over the last decade. Join scholars and defense cyber leaders as they discuss chapters from the recently published book, Ten Years In: Implementing Strategic Approaches to Cyberspace, all with an eye towards the future of US cyber strategy.

The series features authors from the volume, including both academics and Department of Defense cyber leaders, as well as Hoover experts that discuss the history of cyber strategy, cyber warfare, cyberspace talent, and public-private innovation in cyberspace and will be moderated by Dr. Jackie Schneider, Hoover Fellow, Hoover Institution.

Panelists
Admiral James O. Ellis Jr. | Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow, Hoover Institution

Dr. Michael Warner | Command Historian, United States Cyber Command

Dr. Emily Goldman | Strategist, United States Cyber Command

For more information visit https://www.hoover.org/events/ten-years-us-cyber-strategy-chat-series 

Political Thinkers In The Xi Jinping Era

Political Thinkers In The Xi Jinping Era

February 12, 2021

Political Thinkers In The Xi Jinping Era

Wednesday, February 10, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

China’s establishment intellectuals are not widely known beyond its borders. These professors, journalists, writers, and artists try to shape public debate and state policy and more or less play by the Chinese Communist Party’s rules while not acting as spokespeople for it. Ownby will describe the evolution of their “thought world,” which has adapted to Xi Jinping’s tighter strictures, and introduce a number of its key thinkers and themes.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
David Ownby is professor of History at the Université de Montréal in Canada. He has worked on a variety of topics in Chinese history, including the history of secret societies, popular religion in modern and contemporary China, and currently contemporary Chinese establishment intellectuals. He directs the Reading the China Dream project, a website devoted to the world of establishment intellectual thought in contemporary China. 

ABOUT THE DISCUSSANT
Glenn Tiffert is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, where he manages its project on China’s Global Sharp Power. A historian of modern China, his research focuses on the PRC’s political and legal systems. He also works closely with government and civil society partners in the United States and elsewhere around the world to document and build resilience against authoritarian interference with democratic institutions. He currently serves on the executive committee of the Academic Security and Counter-Exploitation Program, an association of US universities established to help heighten security awareness in academia.

Office Hours: Terry Anderson answers your questions on renewing indigenous economies

Office Hours: Terry Anderson answers your questions on renewing indigenous economies

February 3, 2021
Hoover Institution senior fellow Terry Anderson answers frequently asked questions from his "Renewing Indigenous Economies" videos on PolicyEd.
 
Questions:
 
1. In what ways were early indigenous economies like modern free market economies?
2. Are modern ideas of property rights in line with Native beliefs about land ownership?
3. What is standing in the way of Native Americans starting businesses and improving their lives?
4. Why is it important to Native peoples that they stay on their reservation lands?
5. What policies could be enacted to restore tribal sovereignty?
6. Are there examples of tribes that have recovered their sovereignty? What keeps other tribes from doing the same thing?
 
Click below to watch the three videos.
 
Original Indigenous Economies: http://hvr.co/RIE1
Colonialism: Then and Now: http://hvr.co/RIE2
A New Path Forward: http://hvr.co/RIE3
 
Have more questions for Terry? Email your questions to the PolicyEd team or follow us on Twitter.
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